Spot vs. Group Relamping: An Economic Comparison

Reliant Energy

There are a variety of reasons to practice group relamping, in which a set of lamps is replaced at a scheduled time, rather than spot relamping, in which lamps are only replaced when they burn out. Most of these reasons apply to fluorescent and high-intensity discharge (HID) lamps rather than incandescents, which have much shorter lifetimes.

  • Group relamping requires much less labor per lamp than spot relamping. A worker might take as long as a half hour to retrieve and install a single lamp. If all the materials were on hand for a large number of lamps, a worker could move systematically from fixture to fixture and cut the required time to about 3 minutes per lamp. The process would also be less disruptive, because group relamping is usually done outside working hours.
  • Group relamping is easy to schedule and delegate to outside contractors, who have special equipment and training.
  • Group relamping provides brighter and more uniform lighting because lamps are replaced before their output has fully depreciated. Direct energy benefits result if the designer, anticipating group relamping, uses a smaller safety factor.
  • Group relamping offers increased control over the replacement lamps, reducing the chances of mixing incompatible lamps—such as those with different color temperatures.

Recycling Spent Lamps with Air Cycle

The Bulb Eater® lamp crusher from Air Cycle is perfect for compacting and storing the spent bulbs produced during large relamping projects. The EasyPak™ prepaid fluorescent bulb recycling program is a great option for facilities that generate smaller amounts of lamps or other waste. Learn more » Air Cycle lamp recycling solutions